Gmail Adds More Quick Actions Buttons

gmailbuttonsEarlier in the year, Gmail introduced some quick-action buttons to help users improve their email interactions within their inbox. These features allowed for users to interact with various attachments without having to open their messages first. More recently, Google has focused on broadening the amount of support and functionality for the feature itself. Gmail now includes quick action buttons for YouTube, Seamless, OpenTable, and Dropbox. These new quick action buttons are incorporated into Gmail’s design to ensure that users can experience a more efficient email process, recognizing how much most people rely on their email in order to receive updates from these services.

If someone has ordered food from a restaurant on Seamless, Gmail allows them to rate and provide feedback for the business by clicking on a new ‘review’ button that is available. OpenTable works similarly, except it allows for users to edit their dinner reservations from their Gmail inbox. Individuals who make use of services such as Vimeo and YouTube can also benefit; their video clips can now be opened with a ‘view video’ quick action button. Shared Dropbox folders and Google Docs can also now be accessed through quick actions, which will end the need to search through folders in order to find links.

Since the initial release of the quick actions feature, Google has received a lot of positive feedback from users who have been taking full advantage of everything that it has to offer. Google has already stated that the company is planning on adding more quick action buttons in the future. This means that they may partner with more services to introduce them into the widening array of quick actions available. Ultimately, the continued improvements on quick actions will ensure that users have a more efficient and faster email experience every time they visit their Gmail inbox.

This entry was posted in Blog and tagged by Matt Gerchow. Bookmark the permalink.

About Matt Gerchow

Matt Gerchow is a long-time tech enthusiast with roots in the Seattle, WA area. Growing up just a few blocks from Bill Gates, his course in the computer and technology world was determined at an early age as he made inroads at Microsoft and other top 100 Puget Sound based companies. In 2013 as a semi-retired travel author, software developer, martial arts enthusiast and leisure aficionado, he travels the world with his wife and young son.