Cornell Conductor Using Google Glass Technology for Orchestra

This post was last updated on November 3rd, 2014 at 12:22 am

googleglassAssociate professor of music at Cornell University, Cynthia Turner, is now trying out Google Glass in the classroom during rehearsals and concerts. She won a contest to test out the new Google technology. She is now trying to figure out interesting ways that she can incorporate the technology into her daily life and the educational experience that she provides at the university. Her ideas so far have included streaming video from the Glass to give a view from the perspective of the conductor or musician during a concert and also using the Glass app to embed a condensed score.

Turner has already started keeping a blog of her explorations with the new technology. In one blog, she mentions that she believes that if Mozart was alive today, he would have been a classical rock star and probably the first in line to try out the new technology. She also mentions that computer assisted devices might have been able to make Beethoven a little happier and allowed him to accomplish even more. Being able to consider the use of Google Glass from a musician’s perspective certainly provides a little more insight into just how broad of an experience it can provide for anyone who uses the new technology.

According to the Cornell Chronicle, Turner is exploring the use of Google Glass with the help of Tyler Ehrlich. He’s from the upcoming graduating class of 2014 and is known to be a technology addict. Although Turner originally opted to try to use Glass to determine whether or not the technology would even be relevant in daily life, her blog seems to reflect that she is now deciding that Google Glass and its amazing technology could provide a vast array of experiences that were not previously possible.

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About Matt Gerchow

Matt Gerchow is a long-time tech enthusiast with roots in the Seattle, WA area. Growing up just a few blocks from Bill Gates, his course in the computer and technology world was determined at an early age as he made inroads at Microsoft and other top 100 Puget Sound based companies. In 2013 as a semi-retired travel author, software developer, martial arts enthusiast and leisure aficionado, he travels the world with his wife and young son.